Back to BayCHI

· Design, Patterns, Social Design, User Experience

About two years ago in April I spoke at BayCHI for the first time. Rashmi Sinha, who was co-hosting the monthly program asked me to come speak about the Yahoo! Design Pattern library and the social patterns research project I had recently begun in earnest.

It was my first time airing a lot of these ideas in public and I discovered that I felt rather passionate about some of the key points. It was scary but it was a great experience. I believe the podcast of that evening will be out in a little while (I shared the program with the legendary game designer and writer Amy Jo Kim, so it was an honor as well as a privilege).

In the meantime, the project turned into a book and wiki and I actually succeeded Rashmi as Paul Sas’s partner in booking the monthly program.

On April 13, I’ll be back at PARC in Palo Alto closing the circle and reporting to BayCHI on what we (Erin Malone and myself) learned from the effort. I’ll still be behind Steve Portigal and a few other multi-time presenters at BayCHI – maybe we can get a little Saturday Night Live type thing going (“Hey everybody, I’m so happy to be back here speaking at a BayCHI program for the eighth time!”).

See you there?

Designing for play at Ignite Bay Area

· Design, Information Architecture, Social Design, User Experience

Just got sent a link to all the videos from Ignite Bay Area last month.

Here’s my “Designing for Play” talk, a topic I’ll be exploring in greater depth at Web Visions, the Web 2.0 Expo, and Web Directions @media later this year:

There’ll be another Ignite in May coinciding with the Web 2.0 Expo, so get your submission in now.

The vision thing in Portland

· Design, Events, Social Design, User Experience

I’m pretty excited to be heading up to Portland for the first time to speak at Web Visions for the first time in May. Erin Malone and I will be doing our Designing Social Interfaces workshop (which includes learning and playing the Social Mania game), and I’ll be giving a talk on the subject of Designing for Play.

Here’s a little promo to whet your appetite:

WebVisions: Ten Years of Exploring the Future

…and even if the “visionary” thing is just a play on the name of the conference, well flattery will get you everywhere or at least it will get me to embed your video in my blog.

See me and other "web app masters" in San Diego next week

· Applications, Design, Social Design, User Experience

Time is fast running out to sign up for the first stop on the UIE Web App Masters Tour in San Diego on March 23 and 24 next week.

I have to admit I love seeing stuff like this in my inbox:

Oh, and if you’ve scrolled down this far, you can get a $300 discount for San Diego using the promo code CRUMLISH.

See you there?

Tags as collecting behavior

· Design, Information Architecture, Patterns, Searching and Finding, Social Design, User Experience, Yahoo!

When I first started curating the Yahoo! Design Pattern Library, I put “tags” near the top of my list of user interaction patterns to investigate. By that time, Yahoo! had already acquired several pioneers in the tagging realm, Flickr and Delicious, and there were some subtle distinctions in how they implemented the experience.

We got down in the weeds on these and did a lot of research, ultimately settled on offering high-level guidance, and finished the patterns in the course of writing the social patterns book, where we filed tagging under the group of patterns known as Collecting, under Social Objects.

Tagging and other forms of collecting are also an example of social design patterns that mimic game dynamics. Collecting objects is a core “easy fun” activity in many games, and similarly these extremely lightweight social interactions around gathering or tagging objects enable a form of self-interested behavior that creates aggregate value and potentially richer forms of engagement.

Our three new tagging patterns are Tag an Object, Find with Tags, and the somewhat controversial Tag Cloud, which some people view as an “anti-pattern.” Drop by, check them out, and let us know if we can make them any better.

Reposted from Patterns: Tag Collection (Yahoo! Developer Network Blog).