Summit interview with Kent State’s Tom Froehlich

· Design, Information Architecture, Patterns, Social Design, User Experience

When I was in Phoenix for the IA Summit this year, I had the privilege of sitting down with Tom Froehlich of Kent State University’s information department (with Valerie Kelly behind the camera) for a chat about IA, design patterns, social design, and more:

They also spoke with Donna Spencer, Andrea Resmini, Andrew Hinton, Luke Wroblewski, Kevin Cheng, and Eric Reiss, and I look forward to watching their videos too.

Designing for Play slides from WebVisions 2010

· Design, Events, Patterns, Social Design, User Experience

Wow, WebVisions was amazing, as was Portland, and the hospitality of my friends there and the organizers of the conference. Thanks to everyone who made it possible! (I mean, Ukepalooza – say no more.)

Here are the slides from my talk, Designing for Play:

Social design preso from Beyond Findability workshop presented by the IA Institute at the IA Summit

· Design, Information Architecture, Patterns, Social Design, User Experience

Erin posted the latest version of our “5/5/5” talk, as given in Phoenix last week, to Slideshare:

Also, Erin has also posted a blog entry on our poster shown at the Summit, on our evolving efforts to map and visualize the social design space. You can download a PDF of the poster there if you like.

Note, my presentation at BayCHI last night was very close to this one, with a few very minor tweaks, though I may upload the version just so I’ll have it in my own Slideshare account too.

Designing for play at Ignite Bay Area

· Design, Information Architecture, Social Design, User Experience

Just got sent a link to all the videos from Ignite Bay Area last month.

Here’s my “Designing for Play” talk, a topic I’ll be exploring in greater depth at Web Visions, the Web 2.0 Expo, and Web Directions @media later this year:

There’ll be another Ignite in May coinciding with the Web 2.0 Expo, so get your submission in now.

Tags as collecting behavior

· Design, Information Architecture, Patterns, Searching and Finding, Social Design, User Experience, Yahoo!

When I first started curating the Yahoo! Design Pattern Library, I put “tags” near the top of my list of user interaction patterns to investigate. By that time, Yahoo! had already acquired several pioneers in the tagging realm, Flickr and Delicious, and there were some subtle distinctions in how they implemented the experience.

We got down in the weeds on these and did a lot of research, ultimately settled on offering high-level guidance, and finished the patterns in the course of writing the social patterns book, where we filed tagging under the group of patterns known as Collecting, under Social Objects.

Tagging and other forms of collecting are also an example of social design patterns that mimic game dynamics. Collecting objects is a core “easy fun” activity in many games, and similarly these extremely lightweight social interactions around gathering or tagging objects enable a form of self-interested behavior that creates aggregate value and potentially richer forms of engagement.

Our three new tagging patterns are Tag an Object, Find with Tags, and the somewhat controversial Tag Cloud, which some people view as an “anti-pattern.” Drop by, check them out, and let us know if we can make them any better.

Reposted from Patterns: Tag Collection (Yahoo! Developer Network Blog).