Question about OpenID data policies

· Music

Just when I was really starting to enjoy not blogging, I find myself compelled to ramp up the post-o-matic for the new year.
I was just writing a comment on a recent blog entry from Chris Messina and decided to use my OpenID identity attached to this blog (although actually brokered by MyOpenID.com, which presented me with a choice of profiles to share with Chris’s site, telling me
> A site identifying itself as http://factoryjoe.com/blog/ has asked us for confirmation that http://xian.myopenid.com/ is your identity URL.
>
> The site also asked for additional information. It did not provide a link to the policy on data it collects….
So I figure I ought to notify Chris that his site is not providing such a link to his policy, presuming he has one, and to ask in a general lazyweb sort of way, what the standards are for the inclusion and formatting of such a statement of policy.

I am not Spock

· Music

I trust Jon Lebkowsky. I think I even spelled his name right. I met him on the Well, knew him by reputation as a blogger, sxsw presence, and fringeware review alumnus. He and I cohost blog, formerly blog.ind, a featured conference on the Well.
I trust Aldon Hynes. We met as tech-savvy volunteers for the Dean campaign. I interviewed Aldon for the Power of Many book. We were both credentialed bloggers at the 2004 Democratic Convention, which may be the only time we’ve met face to face. A picture David Weinberger took of Aldon and myself in Boston that was posted to Flickr is perennially one of the few image results for searches of me on
Google.
I don’t see what Spock.com has to do with any of this.

Enumerating social media patterns: a work in progress

· Design, Information Architecture, Patterns, Social Design, Teamwork, The Power of Many, User Experience

thumbnail section of social media patterns graph
At BarCamp Block earlier this year I led a discussion of social media design patterns. The slides I posted were really more just about patterns and how we deal with them at Yahoo! But the group exercise was to brainstorm a huge list of social media and social networking activities that could be described and documented as patterns.

These are not the patterns themselves, but at least one pattern could probably be written around each of these gestures. We found it easiest in the brainstorm to just rattle off a list of gerunds (“adding, blocking, friending,” etc.).

The list we came up is also not exhaustive or definitive. It’s one group’s idea of the various patterns that a social system could support. The initial list was posted at the BarCamp Block wiki. Then Kent Bye, one of the participants, took a stab at re-sorting it a bit and created a visualization. He also then hand-copied it into an outline format and sent me his “version two” of the list.

Since then I’ve made a few more tweaks and have produced a version 3 outline. I’ve been working on visualizing it myself, so I turned the OPML into an OmniOutliner file and then imported that into OmniGraffle. The map is so tangled that Graffle had a hard time displaying it without crossing lines, so I spent some more time dragging the various nodes and clusters around until they were each separate. The end result is that it’s huge of course, and still by no means final or exhaustive or authoritative.

In fact, it’s decidedly *not* the taxonomy of social media patterns we’re working on internally at Yahoo! Think of it as an open source, collaborative work in progress. The thumbnail image above links to a full-sized PDF you should feel free to grab to get a better look at the current state of play of this idea, and if you’d like the OPML file or any other format, just drop me a note and I’ll send it to you.

When I get a moment, I’ll drop by the BarCamp Block wiki and upload the file there in several formats too, at least until someone provides a better place for hosting this project.

RE: Join my network on LinkedIn

· long story short, Social Design, The Power of Many, User Experience

'LinkedIn: Invitations Received' screen snap
This is a quandary for me. I try to keep my LinkedIn network literally to people I know and have worked with or with whose work I am familiar. From what I can see, you seem like an excellent person to know, I’m flattered that you enjoy my posts on that list, and I appreciate your providing that context since so many invitations I get have robogreetings on them.
I couldn’t bring myself to click the “I don’t know Jack…” button, but since I take LinkedIn literally (I want to be able to recommend people from my own direct experience) I also don’t feel right accepting your invitation.
I hope you understand.

Reputation and Patterns at SXSW

· conventionology, Patterns, Social Design, The Power of Many, User Experience

Here’s my obligatory plug for my South by Southwest proposals. I’ve got two panels in contention at the cool-but-unwieldy Panel Picker, so I thought I’d provide some shortcuts here. A lot of folks feel that there are too many panels at SXSW and not enough solo presenters. I tend to agree, but I think the problem is really panels that are underprepared or have too many participants. After moderating a panel with five participants last year I’ve decided that that’s too many for a 45 or 50 minute slot. I think four (including moderator) is the max, and three or even two is probably ideal.
The first panel I’m proposing pertains to my ongoing book project (working title: Presence of Mind), on the subject of online/digital identity, reputation, attention, privacy, trust, and presence. Last year, my panel, Every Breath You Take (podcast, my slides) seemed to go over fairly well, despite the gawdawful 10 am but really 9 am because of daylight savings Sunday morning slot (you must recall that Saturday night – and, really, every other night – at SXSW involves a lot of drinking for most attendees.
I took to heart the positive and negative feedback and so the sequel this year will feature just three participants: myself, Ted Nadeau returning from last year, and Andrew Hinton, whose presentation on communities of practice at the IA Summit this year was such a huge success. We’re going to strive to go beyond the typical talking-head panel format and enage the audience in innovative ways. We’re also going to try to take the conversation past the grounwork-laying, high-level philosophizing of last year and hand the attendees some practical tools for building on what we’re tentatively calling the “human operating system.”
If this sounds appealing to you, please go vote for Online Reputation: And I *Do* Give a Damn about My Bad Reputation.
My second proposal draws on my experience running Yahoo!’s Design Pattern Library and moderating a mailing list for pattern authors. I’ve recruited Jenifer Tidwell, the leading figure in UI patterns; Austin Govella, who can talk about implementing a pattern library in a commerical context at Comcast; and James Reffel, also now at Yahoo!, who will share what he learned getting eBay’s pattern engine off the ground.
Luke Wrobleski’s talk on patterns at SXSW last year filled a large room and generated a lot of interest and I’m hoping to serve that same constituency by sharing practical experience and advice in our panel Design Patterns: the Devil’s in the Details, which we described this way:
> Patterns ground frameworks like Rails and Django drive libraries like Prototype, and enable rapid product development at companies big and small. But what happens when patterns go wrong? How do you know when a pattern is right? We’ll examine common issues facing groups who use design patterns and share our experiences at making sure patterns go right.
There are a lot of other great proposals. I kind of wish I could sort my existing votes into star order to remind myself of the ones I’ve already deemed must-sees, but here are a few I’ve been able to recall or find.
* [Agile User Experience – Bigger! Better! Faster! More](http://panelpicker.sxsw.com/ideas/view/123) – Austin Govella, Leisa Reichelt, Dan Harrelson, yo!
* [Roll Over Gutenberg, Tell McLuhan the News](http://panelpicker.sxsw.com/ideas/view/6) – George Kelly
* [The State of Professional Front-End Engineering](http://panelpicker.sxsw.com/ideas/view/146) – Nate Koechley (yes, a Yahoo guy, but this is a must-see, trust me)
* [The Future of Presence](http://panelpicker.sxsw.com/ideas/view/108) – Bryan Oberkirch
* [Redrum in the Rue Morgue: Collaboration in International Communities](http://panelpicker.sxsw.com/ideas/view/642) – Ana Boa-Ventura
* [Build a Site Search Widget](http://panelpicker.sxsw.com/ideas/view/477) – Kent Brewster (another Yahoo guy, but again this is not nepotism or logrolling – Kent is the real deal)
* [Social Network Coups: The Users are Revolting!](http://panelpicker.sxsw.com/ideas/view/232) – Annalee Newitz
* [Do I have to disappear to get anything done?](a href=”http://panelpicker.sxsw.com/ideas/view/274) – Ryan Freitas
* [English: Technology’s Universal Language](http://panelpicker.sxsw.com/ideas/view/481) – the always entertaining and enlightening Kevin Smockler
* [Stop Emailing and Be More Productive](http://panelpicker.sxsw.com/ideas/view/52) – Tantek Çelik
Hit me up in the comments if you’d like to recommend another panel or presenter as well.

BarCamp virgin here – be gentle

· conventionology, Design, Development, Events, Patterns, Social Design, Teamwork, The Power of Many, User Experience

camplogo.jpg
Two years after the first BarCamp (an ad hoc unconference formed initially in response to O’Reilly’s Foo Camp, I’m finally planning to make it to one, this weekend’s BarCampBlock, headquartered at SocialText’s offices in Palo Alto.
According to what I just jotted on the Sessions page on the wiki, I’ve just volunteered to lead or participate in discussions about portable social networks, identity, design patterns, particularly social-media related design patterns, and the gift economy.
I don’t know if I’m qualified to talk about all of those things but when has that ever stopped me before?
Since the moment that Liz Henry and Tara Hunt tipped me off to this event, I’ve had the feeling that this was an important one not to miss. So soon after my wedding and honeymoon and with a rapidly filling-up fall conference schedule, I could have been tempted to let this one slide by, but I have a strong intuition that many of the people I consider friends, heroes, and inspirations will be there and that I’d be kicking myself if I let another Bay Area BarCamp go by without joining in on the fun.
I’ll blog from there if I can find the time between no-spectatorin’ and schmoozin’ and gettin’ things done.