Got VoodooPad?

· The Power of Many

I’m finally down with the wiki way. I get it. It’s light years beyond. It’s most of what I’ve been waiting for.
And VoodooPad is amazing (for OS X users only, sorry), a desktop wiki app. When I finally got that it was easy as a wiki but native to my desktop environment and thus not sluggish or otherwise crippled, I rejoiced. Then I wished it could synch with a public or private web wiki.
It asked me to pay after I created 15 pads. Pretty smart, I was hooked. More importantly, I want to pay them. Sure, I could delete a few minor pages and eke the free period out a little more, but I want my $20 (okay, $19.99) to go to the people woh made this thing so they’ll keep up teh good work.
That’s the thing about the power of many. It’s not that money is going away. Money is a very useful technology. But the tyranny of money is ending. We’ve figured out that many beats money every time. In a more gift-oriented economy, I pay for things I value, because respect each other and negotiate fairly (it’s much closer to being a fair market). You don’t have to pay me to advertise yuor product or service. Just make it good and useful. Just solve a problem for me. Just give me one gadget that can do what I used to need two gadgets to do, and I’ll tell people about you for free. But I (as always) digress.
I’m doing this whole second draft of the book in VoodooPad, I’m telling you. ‘ll have to put the crappy Word formatting back in before I hand chapters back, yes, I know.
I think in the long run blog software is dead, as a bloglike template in a wiki would do all a blog does and more, but this is still the short run and blogs are very important and the logging idea is here to stay.
Someone must remind me to spell out the new protocols for cell phones I’ve worked out (law: waste no time!) in another blog entry. See blogging is still important. Not dead yet.
But wikis are easier and the masses are crying out for what William Burroughs called the philosophy of Do Easy.
To a nerdy kid like me from the ’70s, the recent Cheaper by the Dozen remake left out the best part of the book – the fact that Gilbraith (?) was an efficiency expert. And his method was to find the laziest guy in the factory and watch what he does and then teach everyone else to do it. The twelve redheads, the high jinks, they are cute but they were not the point of the story (to me).
More on this later, I have a chapter draft due.
I think we can safely log any themes or motifs in Chapter 1.